All posts by: Judy Yorke

Let me be clear about this (as politicians like to say). I’m not talking about politics here –  I’m talking about spelling. I teach journalism as well as writing skills, and I find that about 95% of my students who...
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Earlier this month, Judy was asked to deliver an email session as part of a training day for The Sentence Works. The two of us spent an enjoyable few hours scouring our inboxes  (and deleted folders) for emails that were...
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I’m a big believer in short sentences. One of the first exercises we do at my workshops is to take some examples of really long sentences. These come from various sources – a website, a newsletter, an email and a...
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A delegate raised an interesting point at one of our workshops earlier this month. We were talking about acronyms – words formed from the initial letters of another word. Some acronyms are of course very well-known, for instance the RSPCA...
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Many people were taught at school that you shouldn’t begin a sentence with either of these two words. It’s something that still causes heated debate. The thinking behind this was, I believe, that and and but are co-ordinating conjunctions –...
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      Imagine that on your way back from the coffee shop one lunch break, somebody stopped you in the street and asked what you know about classical literature. It certainly beats someone asking you for any spare change...
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Get this one wrong and the Grammar Police will be after you. The people who know the rule get really frustrated with those who don’t! Here I am explaining when to use less and when to use fewer so you’ll...
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I love being a trainer, but journalism is in my blood and I can’t see myself ever giving it up. Even after 25 years, I still get a thrill from seeing my byline, especially if it’s in a national newspaper....
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In English, there are many pairs of words that sound similar, leaving people confused about which one to use. But they can mean very different things. There’s a quiz on our Facebook Page with examples of six of these. How...
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If you listen to children describing something, you can often pick up a common mistake. It’s one that many of us keep on making when we reach a business setting. Kids may describe a film they have just seen as...
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