All posts by: Judy Yorke

With our 11 year son about to take his primary school SAT tests, grammar’s no laughing matter in our house at the moment. My poor boy is trying to remember the difference between active and passive,  work out what a...
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I’ve been doing lots of work on spelling with my 11 year old son ahead of the dreaded SATS. It’s actually been really interesting as I’ve tried to come up with strategies to help him remember how to spell tricky...
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Delegates on the workshop I’m co-running in Bristol today (media skills and press release writing, in case you were wondering) might notice there’s a real spring in my step. After my birthday, Christmas Day, Easter Sunday, and any day Watford...
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I’m often asked to help people write their blogs. It can be one for a charity, related to their hobby or a very personal one about their take on life. But I’m asked to cast my eye over the blogs...
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I had a letter published in my local newspaper yesterday. It’s only the second one I’ve ever written to them, and I have a 100% success rate so far. Without trying to sound smug, I was confident it would be...
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One mistake I see time and time again is apostrophes being used incorrectly with plurals. Many people are just not sure where the apostrophe needs to go when referring, for instance, to men, children and people. The rule is actually...
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Every introductory paragraph is different, but all great intros have some things in common. A good introduction (intro) will grab your attention, keep you reading and offer you the promise that you’re about to discover something you didn’t know before....
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Exclamation marks are a form of shouting – journalists call them screamers for a good reason.  And if you’re writing for professional purposes, you don’t want to shout. After all, you wouldn’t shout at the person if you were phoning...
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There was a really interesting news story yesterday about the use of jargon at work. A judge criticised a social worker for over-using jargon in a report for a family court hearing. The judge said it ‘might as well have...
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I’ve been asked so many questions about commas that I have a little section about the curly little blighters at each workshop. One thing we look at is the comma splice. Now I didn’t know that this grammatical faux pas...
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